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Connecticut Inpatient Drug Rehab Centers

Looking for a top rehab clinic in Connecticut for yourself or someone you love? Rehabs.com contains a wealth of knowledge on exclusive inpatient clinics and can help you find the center that’s right for you. Our drug and alcohol treatment clinics can help anyone get sober, regardless of whether the addiction is to LSD, Panacet, alcohol or any other illicit or doctor-prescribed medication.

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Bridgeport, CT

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Latest Reviews

Latest Reviews of Rehabs in Connecticut

Thomas Murphy Center Intermediate Residential Treatment Program

Been clean for 8 years and now work as a counselor in same facility. Caring, experienced, certified staff. Could use more outside activities.

- BM
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4.7 out of 5
Willimantic, CT

Yale New Haven Psychiatric Hospital

For the most part, nice people that work there. Heavy TV restrictions, no Internet, some of the people working there have bad attitudes, the janitors do not do their job very welll. I hope the cleanliness of the place has improved since I was there. For someone who is a germaphobe, based on my experience, I would not go back there.

- Anonymous
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3.5 out of 5
New Haven, CT

Joshua Center - Mansfield

The facility really helped, there were a lot of options for treatment, such as group therapy, individual therapy, etc. The visiting policies were a little bad. When my sister was here they wouldn't allow us to visit very often.

- Anonymous
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3.7 out of 5
Mansfield Center, CT
Meet the Pros
David W. Hillis, Jr.
David W. Hillis, Jr.
Vice President of Outpatient Operations
AdCare Rhode Island
David W. Hillis, Jr., Vice President of Outpatient Operations, oversees the development of AdCare outpatient services clinics, located throughout Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Mr. Hillis, who has worked in the healthcare field since 1988, has also served as Director of Outpatient Services and as an Outpatient Therapist at AdCare Hospital. He received a B.S. degree in Psychology and a M.S. degree in Psychology (Mental Health Counseling) from Salem State College. Mr. Hillis is also a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) and a Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (CADAC-II), as well as a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (LADC-I).
Jenna
Jenna
Licensed Mental Health Counselor
Harmony Healing Center
Jenna is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor who has experience working in the mental health and substance abuse field in various treatment settings including inpatient and outpatient facilities and a correctional institution. Jenna has performed as a recovery support specialist, behavioral/mental health clinician, and clinical supervisor within these settings. Jenna completed her undergrad at Fitchburg State University where she received her Bachelor of Science in Human Services and from there went on to Cambridge College where she received her Master of Education in Mental Health Counseling with a concentration in trauma. Jenna specializes in evidence-based approaches, motivational interviewing, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and relapse prevention. Jenna has extensive training in conducting assessments, developing treatment plans, and providing a safe therapeutic environment. As a therapist, Jenna’s goal working with individuals struggling with addiction and mental health challenges is to make a positive impact in their life by establishing and maintaining positive rapport and trust. In her free time Jenna enjoys spending time with friends and loved ones, playing with her two dogs, going hiking and snowboarding.
Dr. Patrice M. Muchowski
Dr. Patrice M. Muchowski
VP of Clinical Services
AdCare Outpatient Facility, Quincy
Dr. Patrice M. Muchowski, vice president of clinical services since 1988, is also an associate in the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry and a clinical instructor in Harvard University’s Department of Psychology. Dr. Muchowski holds a doctor of science degree and a master’s of science degree from Boston University, in addition to the following professional certifications: National Certified Addiction Counselor (NAADAC), Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (CADAC), Master Addictions Counselor (MAC), and Proficiency in the Treatment of Alcohol and other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders (APA).
Treatment Facts

Connecticut ranks 4th in treatment centers servicing/accepting persons with HIV or AIDS per 100,000 residents. Massachusetts is ranked one spot worse at spot 5. District of Columbia is ranked slightly better, ranked 3.

When adjusted for population, Connecticut ranks 6th in treatment centers servicing/accepting clients with co-occurring disorders. Colorado is just 1 spot worse, ranked 7 out of the United States. Utah is ranked one spot better at spot 5.

For medicare clients, Connecticut ranks 6th in population-adjusted treatment centers. Kentucky is just 1 spot worse, ranked 7 out of the United States. West Virginia is just 1 spot better, ranked 5 out of the United States.

Connecticut is 7th among U.S. states in treatment centers servicing or accepting adult men. Colorado is just 1 spot worse, ranked 8 out of the United States. Maryland is ranked one spot better at spot 6.

Connecticut ranks 8th in treatment centers servicing/accepting persons who have experienced trauma per 100,000 residents. One spot worse is New Mexico, ranked 9 in the U.S. One spot better is Vermont, ranked 7 in the U.S.

More Info
One of the most comprehensive drug and alcohol use studies in the country is published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Each year they survey Americans in every state to find out who's using what, how often, and whether or not they're getting the treatment they need. The numbers for Connecticut's most recent survey results are published in a document called Connecticut Substance Abuse and Mental Health Issues At-A-Glance - and they are troubling.
According to the survey, Connecticut residents' rates of the following are among the highest in:
  • Past-year marijuana use among those between the ages of 18 and 25
  • Past-month marijuana use among those between the ages of 18 and 25
  • Past-month illicit drug use (other than marijuana) among those 18 to 25
  • Past-month alcohol use among those over the age of 12, between 18 and 25, and over the age of 26
Drug Abuse Among Young Adults
It's clear that the 18-to-25 population is struggling in Connecticut.
The SAMHSA surveys reports that more than 23 percent of that age group had a problem with alcohol abuse or dependence in the year prior to the survey. Additionally, about 12 percent of that same age group struggled with a drug abuse or addiction issue in that same time period. Why? The stresses placed upon young adults grow every year and those who graduate from expensive Connecticut universities into a less-than-welcoming economic climate can find it overwhelming. Add to this the usual pressures of performing well academically, choosing the right career, getting into grad school, and making the right choices in their romantic relationships and it's not hard to understand why drug and alcohol abuse is such a rampant problem.
Addressing the Drug and Alcohol Addiction Issues in Your Family

When a loved one is struggling with drug and/or alcohol dependence, everyone in the family suffers. Problems arise:

  • In the relationships between everyone in the family
  • In the relationships between the addicted person and others
  • Financially
  • In the trust shared by everyone

Though you may have already had a number of informal conversations about the possibility of treatment, it may be time to consider staging a formal intervention. Gathering together others who love your addicted family member and planning to offer them the gift of recovery is a big step - but in many cases, it's a necessary step. It can be the first day that your loved one fully realizes the level of risk that they are taking every day that drug addiction goes untreated.

Staging an Intervention

Before you stage an intervention in Connecticut, take the time to plan it correctly. The more you put into it before the actual intervention, the more likely it is that it will be successful. You can:

  • Gather together three to six people who would like to participate and go over the guidelines of how an intervention works
  • Plan who will speak, in what order, and who will bring the addicted person to the intervention
  • Call the number listed above and talk to a counselor about which drug rehab in Connecticut is best for your loved one.
  • Get matched to the best addiction treatment program for their needs - they may even provide you with a professional interventionist at your request.
  • Pack a bag for your loved one to take to rehab.
  • Stage the intervention and ask your loved one to accept the offer of help.

Are you ready to help someone you love in Connecticut recover from drug and alcohol dependence?