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Outpatient Treatment in Texas

Are you looking for a high-quality substance abuse rehabilitation program in Texas for yourself or a loved one? Rehabs.com offers valuable information about various facilities in the state to help you find the treatment center that’s right for you. We provide information on both inpatient and outpatient drug and alcohol treatment facilities so that you can find the program that will best help you or your loved one on the path toward recovery, whether the addiction is to cocaine, alcohol, methamphetamine, marijuana, oxycodone, or any other illegal or prescription medication.

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Outpatient Treatment Centers in Texas

Arise Recovery Centers
5440 Harvest Hill Rd. Dallas, TX 75230

Cities in Texas

AbileneAlamoAliceAllenAlvinAmarilloAngletonArlingtonAthensAubreyAustinAzleBalch SpringsBastropBay CityBaytownBeaumontBedfordBeevilleBeltonBig SpringBoerneBrenhamBrownsvilleBrownwoodBryanBudaBurlesonCarrolltonCedar HillCedar ParkChannelviewCiboloCleburneClevelandCollege StationColleyvilleConroeConverseCoppellCopperas CoveCorpus ChristiCorsicanaCrosbyCrowleyCypressDallasDaytonDeer ParkDel RioDel ValleDenisonDentonDesotoDickinsonDonnaDuncanvilleEagle PassEdinburgEl PasoElginEnnisEulessFloresvilleFlower MoundForneyFort HoodFort WorthFredericksburgFriendswoodFriscoGainesvilleGalvestonGarlandGatesvilleGeorgetownGilmerGranburyGrand PrairieGrapevineGreenvilleHaltom CityHarker HeightsHarlingenHelotesHendersonHoustonHumbleHuntsvilleHurstHuttoIrvingJacksonvilleKatyKellerKerrvilleKilgoreKilleenKingsvilleKingwoodKyleLa PorteLake JacksonLancasterLaredoLeague CityLeanderLewisvilleLittle ElmLivingstonLongviewLubbockLufkinLumbertonMabankMagnoliaMansfieldMarshallMcallenMckinneyMercedesMesquiteMidlandMidlothianMineral WellsMissionMissouri CityMontgomeryMount PleasantNacogdochesNederlandNew BraunfelsNorth Richland HillsOdessaOrangePalestinePampaParisPasadenaPearlandPflugervillePharrPlainviewPlanoPort ArthurPorterRed OakRichardsonRichmondRio Grande CityRoanokeRobstownRockwallRosenbergRosharonRound RockRowlettRoyse CitySachseSan AngeloSan AntonioSan BenitoSan JuanSan MarcosSchertzSeabrookSeguinShermanSouthlakeSpringStaffordStephenvilleSugar LandSulphur SpringsTempleTerrellTexarkanaTexas CityThe ColonyTomballTylerUniversal CityUvaldeVictoriaVidorWacoWaxahachieWeatherfordWebsterWeslacoWichita FallsWillisWoodwayWylie
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More Info About Rehab in Texas

Latest Reviews

Latest Reviews of Rehabs in Texas

Baylor Scott & White — Substance Abuse Services

Good programs for my mental health issues. I was made comfortable and was not forced to take part in any programs I didnt feel comfortable with.

- Anonymous
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5 out of 5
Temple, TX

Bear Creek Counseling Center

Caring support, treatment for drug and alcohol abuse

- Anonymous
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5 out of 5
Houston, TX

Sundown Ranch, Inc.

Great group councilors but too many in the group.

- Anonymous
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3.7 out of 5
Canton, TX
Meet the Pros
Tyler Harrell
Tyler Harrell
CEO
Greenhouse Treatment Center
“I am passionate about applying knowledge and expertise to effect real change in the lives of others. The disease of addiction requires treatment that is complex, nuanced and often counterintuitive.” In 2018, Tyler Harrell joined Greenhouse Treatment Center as its chief operating officer and transitioned to chief executive officer in late 2019. He has more than 11 years of experience managing and administrating healthcare organizations. He is also a certified licensed professional counselor supervisor and licensed chemical dependency counselor. His clinical background combined with his years of leadership experience have been instrumental in his ability to provide clinical and operational oversight at Greenhouse that is focused on compassionate, quality patient care. Harrell believes in a holistic approach to addiction treatment that involves treating the body and the mind. Harrell treats addiction with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), motivational interviewing (MI), and 12-Step programming. Harrell’s passion for helping those struggling with the disease of addiction is ingrained in every aspect of his work.
Mia Tracy
Mia Tracy
LMSW
Windmill Wellness Ranch
Mia has a Master’s Degree from Stephen F. Austin State University which is located in Nacogdoches, Texas. Her undergraduate degree is in Criminal Justice and Psychology. While living in Nacogdoches, she was employed with the State of Texas in child welfare and the court system. Since moving to the Austin area, Mia has provided therapy services at addiction treatment centers and in a private group therapy practice. Mia works with her clients to “make sense” of the how their history is intersecting with current life experiences. Life can present us with great challenges and those challenges can bring us growth or defeat. Mia will “hold the space” for clients to begin the process of healing and growth. Research has shown that the relationship between the therapist and the client is the best predictor of success. She strives to create a safe environment for clients to express their deepest feelings and thoughts, by being genuine, listening attentively and intuitively. Mia is both compassionate and direct. She uses various therapeutic approaches; such as Mindfulness to connect in with our physical self, Internal Family Systems to discover the narrative, Cognitive Behavioral to learn how thoughts influence emotions and behaviors, and EMDR to work through trauma. Her specialties include Relationship Issues, Attachment Issues, Substance and Process Addiction, Chronic Pain, Body Image, Health and Wellness, Depression/Anxiety/PTSD/Complex Trauma.
Jeremiah Jackson
Jeremiah Jackson
Greenhouse Alumni Coordinator
Greenhouse Outpatient Treatment Center
Jeremiah joined American Addiction Centers in 2015 as the Greenhouse Alumni Coordinator. Originally, from Washington State, Jeremiah is, himself, an alumnus of Greenhouse. Because he has seen first-hand how addiction hurts people and destroys families, he is proud to be in a position to work with other Greenhouse alums, supporting the constructive process of recovery. Planning events, talking with clients, and raising awareness are just a few of his goals with our Alumni graduates.
Texas Treatment Facts

Texas ranks 34th in treatment centers servicing/accepting access to Recovery (ATR) vouchers per 100,000 residents. One spot better is New York, ranked 33 in the U.S. One spot worse is New Jersey, ranked 35 in the U.S.

When adjusted for population, Texas ranks 40th in treatment centers servicing/accepting IHS/638 contract care funds. Tennessee is ranked slightly better, ranked 39. Louisiana is ranked slightly worse, ranked 41.

For no payment accepted clients, Texas ranks 45th in population-adjusted treatment centers. Arizona is ranked one spot better at spot 44. Oregon is just 1 spot worse, ranked 46 out of the United States.

Texas is 46th among U.S. states in treatment centers servicing or accepting other treatment approaches. One spot better is Virginia, ranked 45 in the U.S. Delaware is ranked slightly worse, ranked 47.

Texas ranks 48th in treatment centers servicing/accepting members of military families per 100,000 residents. Tennessee is ranked slightly better, ranked 47. Ohio is just 1 spot worse, ranked 49 out of the United States.

More Info

Texas Treatment Facts

In Texas, overall drug use and drug-related deaths were lower than the national average in 2009-2010. However, Texas was among the top 10 states for cocaine use among persons age 12-17. Marijuana is cited as the number one drug for drug rehab admissions.5

Addiction in Texas

While Texas drug-related deaths remain below the national average, there were 715 deaths due to methamphetamine in Texas in 2016 and 539 due to heroin.6 Marijuana is noted as the most widely used drug, and other drugs, such as PCP, are emerging as a growing threat.6 Although alcohol is a legal substance, the use of alcohol in a binge drinking pattern is the most widely reported substance used by people in Texas.7

While fentanyl is seen as a problem, it has not had as much of an impact in Texas, unlike other states where heroin is often laced with fentanyl. Part of the reason for this low rate of fentanyl-laced heroin is the popularity of so-called “black tar” heroin in Texas, which is a gummy form of heroin that is not easy to mix with powder.6

Overall, Texas has 5.1 opioid overdose deaths per 100,000 people, as compared to a national average of 14.6 per 100,000.8

Texas-Based Drug Statistics

Methamphetamine remains a serious issue in Texas. Treatment admissions related to meth rose from 3% in 1995 to 17% in 2016.6  The state also saw an increase in the proportion of people admitted to treatment for heroin, from 12% in 2012 to 16% in 2016.6

As noted earlier, Texas has been spared some of the higher numbers of opioid overdose deaths. However, the rate of deaths from fentanyl has tripled over the past decade, and heroin overdose deaths doubled during that same period.8

Defining Outpatient Treatment

When people visualize drug rehab, many people think of a 24/7 program where people who need treatment sleep, eat, and go to groups. While many people do attend an inpatient treatment program, many others go to outpatient treatment. Outpatient treatment usually involves the same treatment modalities as inpatient drug treatment, including:1

High-quality treatment is available in both inpatient and outpatient settings. While some outpatient programs offer low-intensity services that only meet once or twice per week, numerous programs meet 4­­–6 hours per day, 5–7 days per week. These high-intensity programs offer the same quality of services as inpatient programs with the only real difference being that participants go home at night.2

For some people, outpatient treatment is not enough, and they need to be in a 24/7 inpatient program, particularly if they are suicidal, or in detox from alcohol or benzodiazepines. In these cases, outpatient may be a step-down from an inpatient detox or treatment program.3

How to Find Outpatient Rehab in Texas

Texas has 362 outpatient substance abuse treatment centers and 62 that have opioid treatment programs.4 Most of these programs are clustered around Dallas and Houston, as well the Eastern half of Texas around San Antonio and Austin. There are some in the Western part of the state, around El Paso, and in the Permian Basin region, in Midland.

Among Texas’ outpatient programs, 53% offered intensive outpatient treatment and 15% offered partial hospitalization.4

Does My Insurance Cover Treatment in Texas?

If you want to attend a rehab program in Texas, it is important to find out which treatment providers are covered under your insurance plan. While many treatment facilities may accept your insurance, costs will vary. It is generally better and cheaper to go with a provider that is part of your insurance company’s network.

Among the most popular insurance providers in Texas are:

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield
  • United Healthcare
  • Humana
  • Aetna
  • Superior
  • Care Improvement Plus
  • Cigna
  • Amerigroup

Texas Insurance (i.e., Medicaid) Treatment Facilities

If you do not have insurance, you may want to explore your eligibility for Medicaid. Medicaid is a government-administered program for healthcare that covers low-income people, children, and people with disabilities who meet certain requirements, including income thresholds.

If you are not eligible for health insurance through your employer or other private plans, check your eligibility for Medicaid in Texas here.

Other Ways to Get Help

Texas has many community resources available to people with SUDs, including the following:

Sources

  1. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2019). Treatment approaches for drug addiction.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2018). Principles of drug addiction treatment: A research-based guide.
  3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2006). Detoxification and substance abuse treatment.
  4. National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. (2017). State page: Texas.
  5. Executive Office of the President of the United States. Texas drug control update.
  6. Maxwell, J. (2017). Substance abuse trends in Texas in 2017. University of Texas School of Social Work.
  7. National Drug Early Warning System: Texas. Sentinel Community Site (SCS) Drug Use Patterns and Trends.
  8. National Institute on Drug Abuse (2019). Texas opioid summary: Opioid involved overdose deaths.